Counseling

Welcome!

This site is designed to help teachers, students, and parents.  You will find resources on many topics that fall into school counseling's three domains:  academics, personal/social, and career. If you need more information or would like to talk to Black River Falls's school counselors, please call or email.

Download our brochure.

Ashley Weibel
715-284-5315, Ext. 3022

Roberta Kostka
715-284-5315, Ext. 3021

Academics

School Counseling Academic Standards

  • Standard A:  Students will acquire the attitudes, knowledge, and skills that contribute to successful learning in school and across the lifespan.
  • Standard B:  Student will develop the academic skills and attitudes necessary to make effective transitions from elementary to middle school, from middle school to high school, and from high school to a wide range of post secondary options.
  • Standard C: Students will understand how their academic experiences prepare them to be successful in the world of work, in their interpersonal relationships, and in the community.

Links

40 assets

Research has found that the 40 Developmental Assets shown below are the building blocks of healthy development. The more assets a person attains, the more likely he/she is to be successful in school and life. For specific examples and tips on how to practice and implement the assets follow the link.

Eighth Grade Individual Conference (Academic and Career Planning)

Each year the middle school counselors meet with all 8th-grade students to start the conversation about what their future holds for them. They will go over what high school looks like-–what classes they are required to take and what they get to pick on their own; what clubs are available to them to be involved; and how they can start working towards their own career path.

Personal/Social

School Counseling Personal/Social Standards

Standard D: Students will acquire the attitudes, knowledge, and interpersonal skills to understand themselves and appreciate the diverse backgrounds and experiences of others.
Standard E: Students will demonstrate effective decision-making, problem solving, and goal setting skills.
Standard F:  Students will understand and use safety and wellness skills.

Self-Injury

Understanding Self-Injury

Suicide

http://www.preventsuicidewi.org/
http://hopeline.com/

Depression

http://www.helpguide.org/

Peer Pressure

http://www.greatschools.org/gk/articles/6-tips-resisting-peer-pressure/

Self-Esteem

Self esteem is important in teens' lives because it can determine levels of motivation, self worth, and future achievement levels and relationships.  Self esteem helps teens deal with emotional stress and make good choices.

How to Build Self Esteem
  • Provide unconditional love and respect.
  • Have teens make a list of things they like about themselves and are good at.
  • Show true companionship and interest when you're with a teen.
  • Actively praise accomplishments.
  • Display appropriate and consistent discipline.
  • Show affections towards teens (hugging when appropriate is okay)
  • Display accomplishments (awards, photos, etc.)
  • Have teens write goals and help them accomplish them.
  • Encourage teens to focus on their successes.
Warning Signs of Low Self Esteem
  • Walking with their head down
  • Doesn't make eye contact when talking
  • Uses negative "I am" statements
  • Often involved in teasing, name calling, or gossiping about others
  • Engages in inappropriate physical contact or avoids physical contact
  • Excessive bragging about themselves, their achievements, or appearance
  • Avoids social situations
  • Apologizes constantly
Additional Resources

Source for this information:  Operation Parent, www.operationparent.org, Parent Handbook 5th edition 2013-14

40 assets

Research has found that the 40 Developmental Assets shown below are the building blocks of healthy development. The more assets a person attains, the more likely he/she is to be successful in school and life. For specific examples and tips on how to practice and implement the assets follow the link.

Bullying

Bullying is defined as repeated and unwanted aggressive behavior that occurs over a period of time with an imbalance of power between the bully and the victim. Bullying behaviors can take many forms, including hitting, teasing, name-calling, intimidation, social exclusion, and sending insulting texts or emails. Girls who bully are more likely to use verbal and social methods, while boys who bully are more prone to use physical violence. 

Regardless of what form bullying takes, developing an understanding of bullying and the facts and myths that surround it is critical to dealing with it effectively. You must be aware of its warning signs and be prepared to help kids who are bullied, kids who bully, and kids who are bystanders to bullying. 
 
Keep in mind that it’s important to show kids how to resolve problems firmly and fairly, to guide them toward demonstrating assertive behavior, and to teach them that it’s OK to say "No" to unacceptable demands.  Creating an emotionally and physically safe environment requires a coordinated effort among staff, students, families, and your community.

Resources for Parents, Staff, and Students

These resources and more located in the following PDF:  http://educate.crisisprevention.com/rs/crisisprevention/images/School-Bullying-Prevention-Resources-Guide.pdf?mkt_tok=3RkMMJWWfF9wsRoivKvLZKXonjHpfsX64uQqXaeg38431UFwdcjKPmjr1YEDScV0aPyQAgobGp5I5FEPS7jYS7Z1t60LWg%3D%3D

Cyberbullying

Tips and Advice
  • Cyberbullying can be stealing passwords, sending offensive texts, creating websites to humiliate someone or spreading rumors using social media.
  • Passwords should not be shared with friends!
  • Google your child's name to see what is on the internet about them.
  • If your child tells you they are being cyberbullied, stay calm and have them show you what he/she received.
  • If there are threats of physical violence, call the police.
  • Teach these 3 steps:  Stop-don't respond to a message, Block-through social media, block the bully and limit your communication with friends about the incident, Tell-inform a trusted adult and show them everything.
Warning Signs Your Teen is Being Cyberbullied
  • Unexpectedly stops using computer or cell phone
  • Appears nervous when texts or emails appear
  • Appears uneasy about going out or going to school
  • Becomes withdrawn
  • Appears angry or frustrated after using a cell phone or computer
  • Trouble sleeping, loss of appetite, excessively moody or crying
  • Suspicious phone calls, e-mails and packages arrives at your home
  • Possible drop in academic performance
Links

Source for this information:  Operation Parent, Parent Handbook 5th edition 2013-14

Grief

Grieving is a hard time for all involved.  Teens can grieve for a variety of reasons.  It's important to make sure teens express their feelings in appropriate ways because if they are not guided, they are more susceptible to choose negative coping strategies.

Anxiety

Tips and Advice
  • Reduce chaos at home (establish routines)
  • Turn technology off at night
  • Early to bed at night
  • Help them eat healthier
  • Don't load them with too many activities
  • Pay attention to their feelings-use a journal to record feelings
  • Stay calm when child is anxious about a situation or event
  • Recognize and praise small accomplishments
  • Don't punish mistakes or lack of progress
  • Be flexible and try to maintain a normal routine
Warning Signs
  • Complaining of physical symptoms, such as frequent stomach aches, headaches, or muscle aches
  • Feelings of intense fear for no reason
  • Preoccupation or recurring thoughts, such as worrying about getting sick
  • Fear of social situations or fear of meeting new people
  • Extreme shyness
  • Constant worrying about upcoming events, tests, social situation
  • Physical signs such as racing heart, shortness of breath for no reason
  • Extreme nervousness of irrational fears or new places and new situations
  • Depression

Links

www.anxietycoach.com

www.teenhelp.com/teen-stress

Alcohol and Other Drugs

Alcohol and other drugs are prevalent in most any community. Being informed about their dangers and educating you child about the difference between healthy and unhealthy choices can help them.

Career

School Counseling Career Standards

  • Standard G:  Students will acquire the self-knowledge necessary to make informed career decisions.
  • Standard H: Students will understand the relationship between educational achievement and career development.
  • Standard I:  Students will employ career management strategies to achieve future career success and satisfaction.

Career Cruising

What is Career Cruising? Career Cruising is an industry-leading online career guidance and planning system. People of all ages use these tools to explore education and training options, find the right career, and build their own portfolio. 

Career Cruising has been designed with one goal in mind: to help students plan their future. With exceptional assessment tools, detailed occupation profiles and comprehensive post-secondary education information, students move seamlessly through the career exploration and planning process. The powerful portfolio system helps students make concrete, long-term plans, and gives students access to the real-time information and statistics needed to track their progress and achievement.

Portfolio

Think of your Portfolio as your own online filing cabinet. In it, you can keep all the information you need to plan your education and career path. The Career Portfolio can help you keep notes on the careers that interest you, develop an education plan based on your careers interests, express your career and life goals, and be a record keeping site for all your extra-curricular activities and work experiences.

Click here to go to Career Cruising.

Eighth Grade Individual Conference (Academic and Career Planning)

Each year the middle school counselors meet with all 8th-grade students to start the conversation about what their future holds for them. They will go over what high school looks like-–what classes they are required to take and what they get to pick on their own; what clubs are available to them to be involved; and how they can start working towards their own career path.

40 assets

Research has found that the 40 Developmental Assets shown below are the building blocks of healthy development. The more assets a person attains, the more likely he/she is to be successful in school and life. For specific examples and tips on how to practice and implement the assets follow the link.

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